How the Most Lopsided Trade in NBA History Explains the World

When you study the rosters of all 30 National Basketball Association teams or even casually watch a game, you find yourself facing two stubborn facts: 1 - Every team possesses an international mosaic of talent. 2 – The last All-Star produced by the high schools of New York City is 32 years old and just changed his name to Metta World Peace.

Calling hoops “the city game”, as Pete Axthelm did 40 years ago, only makes sense if the city is Barcelona. Two decades of globalization alongside the crumbling of our urban infrastructure has dramatically altered who we see on the court.  If there was one moment that represents both the birth and brutal pathos of this process, it was draft day 1998 when two teams took part in what must be seen as the most lopsided trade in NBA history. That was when a Michigan Wolverine superstar born and raised in inner-city Detroit, Robert “Tractor” Traylor, was sent from the Dallas Mavericks to the Milwaukee Bucks for a skinny teenager from a place called Wurzburg, Germany named Dirk Nowitzki, and role player Pat Garrity. Now Dirk is considered the best player on earth and Robert Traylor is dead, passing away earlier this year from a heart attack at the tender age of 34.

It’s unbelievable that these two folks were traded for one another. But equally unbelievable is that this was seen as a steal for the Milwaukee Bucks. Then CNN/SI scribe Dan Shanoff wrote at the time, “After trading away No. 4 draft-pick Stephon Marbury last year, the Bucks get it right in ’98 by stealing the marketable and talented Robert Traylor from the Mavs for an overhyped foreign prospect.”

I asked Dan Shanoff about this ill-fated prediction this week, and he said, "Looking back, I am mostly appalled at my simple-minded analysis and implicit xenophobia. Projecting (and developing) draft picks into Hall of Famers demands imagination that Don Nelson and Mark Cuban clearly had and I lacked. I also didn't account for the maniacal dedication that Dirk would put in to honing his craft. It is perhaps the ultimate irony that as my 5-year-old son became aware of basketball this past spring, he announced that Dirk was his favorite player. Nowitzki's talents are that obvious. I only wish I could have understood that back then."

We can laugh, scoff, or shake our heads at Dan Shanoff,  but his analysis wasn’t a wild statement by any stretch. They represented my thoughts at the time along with most observers. But in hindsight it’s now clear that this deal was more than the most lopsided trade in hoops history. It was a "canary in the coal mine" for the way the game and the world has changed over the last 15 years.

The Dirk story is now well known. From Wurzburg, Germany, the 19 year old blew up in pre-draft workouts and, despite having the muscle tone of a baby deer, became the object of numerous team’s affections, including the Celtics (who had to “settle” that year for Paul Pierce.) But in the shadow of Dream Team I and II and the utter domination of “our guys” at the Olympics, the conventional wisdom was that Euro players were too weak, too fragile, and basically too lame to make it on the big stage. A soft seven-foot jump shooter? Not in this man's league.

The Traylor story is less known. He averaged 16 points and 10 boards as a junior at Michigan, and was the Big Ten Tournament MVP. His freshman year, “the Tractor “ tore down a rim and made it look easy. With the sweet charisma of a gentle giant, Traylor was in a national sneaker ad before his first pro game. He was “Big Man”, “Barkley, Jr.,” and any nickname that speaks to those rare players whose baby fat makes them magically aerodynamic. Traylor, as Shanoff wrote, was seen as a “can’t miss”: the Big 10 Superstar with the big league body.

But Traylor’s body didn’t go from baby fat to Baby Shaq. Instead he battled obesity throughout his career. He also battled income tax evasion charges that ended in a conviction for hiding the money of his cousin, a convicted drug dealer, But Traylor's greatest obstacle wasn’t weight, taxes, or scandal. It was his production on the court. In 438 NBA games, Traylor averaged 5 points and 4 rebounds. He then bounced across the globe, playing for professional teams from Turkey to Puerto Rico. It was in Puerto Rico when Traylor was talking on the phone with his wife when, she thought, the line disconnected. Unable to reach him again, she called team officials who found him dead of a heart attack.

It was remarked by those who knew Traylor that this cause of death was painfully ironic, given his generous heart. ESPN’s Jemele Hill, who is from Detroit, wrote, “He was generous to a fault. Traylor, like a lot of promising, black athletes from troubled backgrounds, never learned to say, ‘no.’ He received three years probation after he admitted he prepared a false tax return that hid the assets of his cousin, Quasand Lewis, a convicted drug dealer. He squandered a lot of his NBA millions, admitting in a 2009 Detroit Free Press story that he once took care of as many as 20 friends and family.”

Traylor was the guy from the projects who’s bigger, stronger, and faster than everyone else and is pegged for the NBA from the time he walked onto a court. Everyone told him that he would be a star, that the money would always be there, and that he had to take care of his friends at all costs. He also, even in Detroit, had the inner-city infrastructure, from youth leagues to avid boosters, that gave him a path to the League. Dirk was a skinny kid who had no justification to believe that a beanpole from Germany could ever be hailed as the best in the game. For several years other GM’s watched Dallas, and dipped one toe in the water, thinking the game’s globalization might just be a mirage.

Now the league is filled with badass players from across the earth. It’s also filled with Dirk imitators, born both inside and outside the states: seven footers who rain jumpers for days. It says a great deal that arguably the league’s best player, Kevin Durant, plays like Dirk and is from the Maryland suburbs. Rough, rugged, and raw rebounders like Traylor, with a little meat on their middle are in very short supply. As for Detroit, the attacks on the city's union and non-union workers has never missed a beat, and it's spent 15 years as victim of every neoliberal "shock therapy" on the populace. Last year, it was named the United States’s “most stressful city” by virtue of being in the top 10 for murders, robberies, poverty, and, yes, heart attacks.  Brutal cuts to city programs has also meant that extracurricular activities, exercise, and for some, opportunity, have become casualties of “the new normal.”  As we spend this shortened season celebrating Dirk, let’s also remember Robert Traylor and the way this one trade marked a fork in the road toward a very different NBA: a different NBA that reflects they way our world has changed and left many behind.

10 Reader Comments | Add a comment

I feel so guilty about Robert Traylor

What is the point of this lazy article other than to throw around meaningless leftist slogans and white guilt?

Robert Traylor ate himself to death because he same from Detroit?

The NBA doesn't want tough rebounders anymore because they come from the inner-city? What about Kevin Love?

Kevin Durant isn't a real black player because he comes from suburban Maryland (like you)?

This is a typical posturing article that abandons logic in favor of hollow rhetoric.

All Too familar

This article points to one of the great things about sports. You never know. For every GM, columnist and fan that things they know something about predicting the next great player this a great reminder. I think you also need to give credit to the Nelsons and Mark Cuban for believing and sticking with Dirk through tough times. Had that relationship severed years ago when they seemed to not be able to win Dirk would have left Dallas and possibly the NBA without a ring.

Kevin Love plays tough but he also isn't afraid to put up a three. I don't think he was talking about Durant not being black but noticing that he's playing the game like a European. It used to be that everyone thought Europeans were to this or that to play in the NBA and that their game didn't translate. Now all big men strive to have a game like Dirk where they can shot long jumpers and run the floor.

All Too familar

This article points to one of the great things about sports. You never know. For every GM, columnist and fan that things they know something about predicting the next great player this a great reminder. I think you also need to give credit to the Nelsons and Mark Cuban for believing and sticking with Dirk through tough times. Had that relationship severed years ago when they seemed to not be able to win Dirk would have left Dallas and possibly the NBA without a ring.

Kevin Love plays tough but he also isn't afraid to put up a three. I don't think he was talking about Durant not being black but noticing that he's playing the game like a European. It used to be that everyone thought Europeans were to this or that to play in the NBA and that their game didn't translate. Now all big men strive to have a game like Dirk where they can shot long jumpers and run the floor.

If you think it's a lazy column Tornado. . .

It must be a good one. It's almost like DZ pisses you off almost every week. Which is also good--because you need to be pissed off and get knocked down a few pegs. Watch the obsessed Tornado try to set Dave straight--and fall right flat on his face with his finger pointing and name calling.

At least the slapstick comedy comes for free.

Why Globalization and Free Markets Are Good

You're right, it's another brilliant metaphor.

When you think about it, Robert "Tractor" Traylor was like General Motors circa 1980: bloated, corrupt, and unwilling to adapt. Frozen by trade barriers, union-pacts and xenophobia.

Then world markets opened up Traylor to fresch competition. Dirk, Yao Ming, Pau Gasol, and Manu Ginobli come in with superior products for the fans-- faster, better shooters, more versatile.

Those who don't adapt like Traylor get left behind. But many American producers and workers get better: Kevin Durant becomes the best player in the game.

Overall, the NBA (and the world is better off). New players get a chance (like the millions of poor people lifted out of dire poverty and starvation in China, South Korea & Brazil). The American players/producers who get better. And the fans who get to watch a better game of basketball (American consumers).

Only wealthy American "radicals" like Comrade Zirin lament these developments as "neoliberal." shock doctrine, blah blah blah.

RE: Why Globalization and Free Markets Are Good

Tornado, your analysis misses a point, which is that globalization often leads to disuse (as Dave is arguing here), and not always because the international product is better. I recently blogged about the growing European presence in basketball here: http://resistingspectator.wordpress.com/2012/01/09/the-nba-might-have-to-move-to-europe-considering-whiteness-in-the-nba/.

Bottom line, the NBA is internationalizing is not from need for better skilled players or in the interest of the global game. It seeks global expansion of its brand. You're ascribing a level of altruism that may not be warranted.

Don't get me wrong: I see your point. I'm not an isolationist nor do I oppose the inclusion of international players. Clearly, the NBA is better for having Dirk Nowitzki, but he is really the rarest of rare birds.

If you think globalization has lifted people out of poverty....

If you think globalization has lifted people out of poverty.... you are either the anti-Christ or the dumbest fu@king person who has ever lived. I"ll let you choose.

Wha?

Hey "Tornado", can you please elaborate on what constitutes a "real black player" in your tiny racist mind?

Race-baiting Mike clueless about = ?

I'm mocking the race-baiting metaphors that Comrade Zirin (and apparently you) regularly traffick in. Note the "?"

The truth is Comrade Zirin is the racist. He doesn't look at black people as people. He views them as ciphers for his bourgoisie "radical" politics.

I quote John McWhorter in a great review of Comrade Zirin:


'Black people fought for their freedom to be normal, not to be rebels. However, I suspect that Zirin would disagree: he wants black people to practice anti-authoritarianism in order to Speak Truth to Power. But once again Zirin cancels himself out: apparently black people are to channel their inner Malcolm X (not smiling, mind you) even if the basketball industry makes less money as a result—and pays its players (who are mostly black) less.'

http://www.city-journal.org/html/rev2007-06-28jm.html

Most Lopsided Trade

First, not having visited this site for a while, I'm a bit taken aback by the right-wing vitriol directed as much at Zirin himself as it is at his ideas. Hopefully, this is a sign of your growing recognition and influence, Dave. Second, I take the point but you are making here, but you need not exaggerate in order to make it. Slow your roll: Dirk is a great athlete and sure-fire Hall of Famer, but he is hardly "the best player on the planet."

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Dave Zirin is the author of the book: "Welcome to the Terrordome: The Pain, Politics and Promise of Sports" (Haymarket). You can receive his column Edge of Sports, every week by going to dave@edgeofsports.com.
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